GCN
GCN

GCN - 366

Welcome to the January Issue of GCN! Our gorgeous cover feature is by photographer Babs Daly, realising her Queer Utopia with model John Mangru. Expect another stunning collab between artist Neave Alouf and activist Ollie Bell, founder of Trans and Intersex Pride Dublin, within.
Inside you’ll find an essential article about Mother and Baby Homes and how the survivors and their advocates are battling a wall of silence. Read about a new international research project aiming to make life better for the intersex community, and check in the volunteers who make the sexual health programme MPOWER possible. There’s a fantastic piece about public parks becoming queer spaces and a look at the flourishing LGBTQ+ zine scene.
You’ll also find tons of news from across the country as LGBTQ+ community organisations fill us in on what’s happening, and lots lots more!

GCN 366 Articles

FROM THE TEAM
Welcome, dear reader, to our January 2021 issue!
The Park
When a piece of queer art caused a childhood memory to come flooding back, Hannah Tiernan reflected on the hidden meaning public spaces once had for gay people, and how they were viewed by outsiders
Queer Utopia: Neave Alouf & Ollie Bell
Queer Utopia lives!
Queer Future:
Queer Utopia: Babs Daly & Stephen Moloney
Our second Queer Utopia team-up are the super talented duo, Babs Daly & Stephen Moloney
Utopian Possibilities
The trouble with something imagined is that it is likely
People MPower
The MPOWER team provide an essential service to gay and bisexual men and other MSM in Ireland, empowering them with sex-positive and judgement-free services and resources. Brendan Kelly Palenque spoke to some of the volunteers that make the service possible
EMPATHY, HOPE AND QUEER JOY will help us all to step boldly into 2021
As this unprecedented year comes to a close, Managing Editor Lisa Connell reflects on some of the lessons we have learned, and the role queer joy will play in the continuing fight for a better world for all of our diverse LGBTQ+ community
2020 in numbers
It’s been quite the year for GCN. Simliar to the organisations around the world, the pandemic brought about huge changes in the way we deliver our services as your national LGBTQ+ press. For many months, we had to put pause to our beloved print edition of the magazine due to COVID-19 restrictions (so you can imagine how delighted we are knowing this issue is out in the world!) but, as with many others, we also found ways to thrive. Here are just a few of our own personal highlights
#2020 QueerVision
It’s been a memorable year for Ireland’s LGBTQ+ community. Here are just some of the highlights that took place across the country over the past 365 days
Gold medal achievements
The past 12 months have been difficult for lovers of all things sport. While many LGBTQ+ inclusive clubs gathered for brief periods of training throughout the year, most of 2020 was spent apart. However, as Karina Muray describes, there were still a few notable events and 2021 will most definitely provide more opportunities for getting active!
A STATE OF SILENCE
Those who have survived institutional human rights abuses in Ireland refer to the saying ‘deny until we die’ - where the State and Church keep enacting policies and barriers until the problem goes away. In light of the Commission of Investigation (Mother and Baby Homes and certain related matters) Bill 2020, Oisin Kenny speaks with survivors and advocates about the ongoing tactics of silence and the need for accountability moving forward
The Fight For Visibility
Empowering a multinational network of 21 organisations from across 10 countries, a new research project, Intersex - New Interdisciplinary Approaches, aims to shed light on the lived experiences of intersex people.
I Feel Zine
Expression and creativity outside the mainstream, targeting like-minds and fellow bold thinkers, zines are a blast of anarchic energy. With queer creations on the rise, Chris Rooke got the lowdown from some of the makers (who also kindly provided the images)
Access to Health
When Catherine E Hug, a writer for GCN based in the United States, had to access healthcare suddenly, the experience and the stigma attached to it caused her to think about how others may struggle in accessing the care they need